skip to main content
MADB Logo
Derry Borough Municipal Authority
620 North Chestnut Street
Derry, PA 15627

724-694-2305
  • ethel-flag-b
ethel-flag-b1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Annual Drinking Water Quality Report for
The Municipal Authority of the Borough of Derry
Public Water System I.D. 5650049

 04/17

Este informe contiene informacion muy importante sobre su agua de beber. Traduzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien. (This report contains very important information about your drinking water. Translate it, or speak to someone who understands it.)

Last year as in previous years, your tap water continued to meet all U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Pennsylvania drinking water health standards, Derry Municipal Authority vigilantly safeguards its water supplies and once again we are proud to present you with our Annual Drinking Water Quality Report. We are again pleased to report that in our system no MCL’s or Treatment Techniques were exceeded.

Our water sources are the McGee Run Dams. These are surface water sources located on Chestnut Ridge where we collect water from rainfall and snowmelt. Water then flows by gravity to Ethel Springs Reservoir and then to our filter plant. Our back-up sources of water consists of a well on Chestnut Ridge, which draws water from the Mauch Chunk/Burgoon Aquifer and a interconnect pump station situated in Derry Township with the Latrobe Municipal Authority. Well water, when used, is piped to the McGee Run Dams then to Ethel Springs Reservoir where the entire treatment process is monitored daily to insure that proper chemical dosages are being added. The pump station delivers filtered water to our distribution system which is ready to drink. All processes are done according to strict regulatory procedures.

A Source Water Assessment of the Ethel Springs Reservoir, which supplies water to the Derry Borough Water Filtration Plant, was completed in 2003 by Spotts, Stevens and McCoy Inc. for the PA Department of Environmental Protection (PA DEP). The Assessment has found that the Ethel Springs Reservoir is potentially most susceptible to accidental spills along roads and storm runoff. Overall, the Ethel Springs Reservoir has little risk of significant contamination. Summary reports of the Assessment are available by writing to Manager, Amy Forsha, 620 N. Chestnut Street, Derry, PA. 15627 and will be available on the PA DEP website at www.dep.state.pa.us (Keyword: “DEP source water"). Complete reports were distributed to Municipalities, Water Supplier, local planning agencies and PA DEP offices. Copies of the complete report are available for review at the PA DEP Greensburg Regional Office, Records Management Unit at 724-925-5400.

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Amy L. Forsha, Manager at (724-694-2305) daily from 7:30 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. Your may also e-mail us at: manager@derrywater.com. We are also available to receive your comments on Facebook (search: Derry Borough Municipal Authority). We want our valued customers to be informed about their water utility. If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled meetings. They are held on the third Wednesday of each month at 7:00 P.M. at the Authority office complex located at 620 North Chestnut Street, Derry, PA 15627

The Municipal Authority of the Borough of Derry routinely monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The following table shows the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1st to December 31st, 2016. All drinking water, including bottled drinking water, may be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some constituents. It's important to remember that the presence of these constituents does not necessarily pose a health risk.

In the following table you will find many terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with. To help you better understand these terms we have provided the following definitions:

Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) 

Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter

Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) - Picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.

Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) - nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person.

Action Level (AL) –the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.

Treatment Technique (TT) - A treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL’s are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - The “Goal” (MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) –The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Minimum Residual Disinfectant Level (MinRDL)The minimum level of residual disinfectant required at the entry point to the distribution system.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) –The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contamination.

DETECTED SAMPLE RESULTS

Chemical Contaminants

Contaminant

MCL in CCR Units

MCLG

Level Detected

Range of Detections

Units

Sample Date

Violation Y/N

Sources of Contamination

Barium

2

2

0.0429

(a)

ppm

10/03/2016

N

Discharge of drilling wastes; Discharges from metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits

HAA5

60

NA

15

 8.2-19.2

ppb

2/2/2016

5/2/2016

8/10/2016

11/4/2016

Y

By-product of drinking water disinfection

TTHM

80

NA

26

8.81-32.8

ppb

2/2/2016

5/2/2016

8/10/2016

11/4/2016

Y

By-product of drinking water disinfection

Chlorine

MRDL =4

MRDLG =4

0.73

.46-.73

ppm

February 2016

N

Water additive to control microbes

(a) Only one sample required

 

Entry Point Disinfectant Residual

Contaminant

MinRDL

Lowest Level Detected

Range of Detections

Units

Sample Date

Violation Y/N

Sources of Contamination

Chlorine

0.2

0.35

.35-.80

ppm

5/16/16

N

Water additive to control microbes

 

 

Lead and Copper

 

Contaminant

Action Level (AL)

MCLG

90th Percentile Value

Units

# of Sites Above AL of Total Sites

Violation Y/N

Sources of Contamination

Lead

15

0

0

ppb

0 out of 20

N

Corrosion of household plumbing

Copper

1.3

1.3

.176

ppm

0 out of 20

N

Corrosion of household plumbing

                           

 

Microbial

Contaminant

MCL

MCLG

Highest # of Positive Samples

Violation Y/N

Sources of Contamination

Fecal Coliform and E. Coli

Routine and repeat samples are total coliform-positive and either E. coli-positive or system fails to take repeat samples following E. Coli-positive routing sample or system fails to analyze total coliform-positive repeat sample for E. Coli

0

1 (+) positive sample, check samples (-) negative

N

Human and animal fecal waste

 

 

Turbidity

Contaminant

MCL

MCLG

Level Detected

Sample Date

Violation Y/N

Source of Contamination

Turbidity

TT=1 NTU for a single measurement

0

0.18

5/25/2016

N

Soil Runoff

TT= at least 95% of monthly samples <0.3 NTU

99.95%

 

Total Organic Carbon (TOC)

Contaminant

Range of % Removal Required

Range of percent removal achieved

Number of quarters out of compliance

Violations Y/N

Source of Contamination

TOC

25-35%

27-46%

0

N

Naturally present in the environment

 

  • We had no detections of Volatile Organic Compounds or Synthetic Organic Compounds.
  • Our samples for TTHM’s and HAA5’s were required to be collected August 2, 2016 +/- 3 days , however they were not collected until August 10, 2016.

All sources of drinking water are subject to potential contaminants that are naturally occurring or man made. Those contaminants can be microbes, organic or inorganic chemicals, or radioactive materials. Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

Additional information on lead:

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The Municipal Authority of the Borough of Derry is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing you tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have you water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive materials, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

  • Microbial contaminants, such as viruses and bacteria, which may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
  • Inorganic contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining or farming.
  • Pesticides and herbicides, which may come from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.
  • Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are byproducts of industrial process and petroleum production and mining activities.
  • Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally-occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, EPA and DEP prescribes regulations which limit the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems. FDA and DEP regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water, which must provide the same protection for public health.           

Water System improvements:

The Authority replaced approximately 900 feet of water line along Pine Street last summer.  Due to the SR 217 bridge construction/demolition 500 feet of 12” raw water line was also replaced. In addition the Authority was involved in a small waterline relocation project at the intersection of SR 217 and Owens Ave. The Authority also just received a $223,890 Small Water and Sewer grant to make electrical upgrades to the water treatment plant. The grant will be used to replace 1933 pumps with new pumps and motors with variable frequency drives to save in electricity costs. In addition the electrical service will by upgraded.  

don't waste water
Conserve water
 
Don't pollute our water ways
Don’t pollute our waterways
Fix leaks
Fix water leaks

Pennsylvania now requires us to institute an automated telephone dialing system for public notifications. We will use this system to notify you of water disruptions, emergencies and violations.  Please keep your contact information current with us. You can call, email (manager@derrywater.com) or stop by our office to update your information.

Your Authority fully complies with all Maximum Contaminant Levels, monitoring and treatment procedures required under the Safe Drinking Water Program. In addition, we are a member of the Partnership for Safe Water, which further establishes and fosters the highest goals for drinking water. Please visit our Web Site at www.derrywater.com for more information. We ask that all our customers help us protect and conserve our water sources which are vital to our community, our way of life and our future regional growth.

Amy Lee Forsha
Manager

Return to Top of Page

Copyright © 2017 Municipal Authority of Derry Borough, Westmoreland County, PA. All Rights Reserved